Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Full-Figured Raven Dolls by Two Companies

We doll enthusiasts read and hear a lot of negative comments about unrealistic doll proportions. In this post, I want to share two manufacturers' alterations to their basic fashion doll bodies to better represent a fuller figured actress, Raven-Symone.

Two months ago, I had mentioned Mattel's That's So Raven doll. I had decided to use that body for Mattel's Festivals of the World Carnival Barbie. I was happy that the Raven doll body is rounder than most Barbie bodies. That difference made me wonder. Was the Play Along Galleria Garibaldi's doll body different, too? Guess what? It is. The Play Along Galleria's doll body is heavier than the basic Play Along fashion dolls.

Let's start with the Mattel Raven: her legs and torso are shorter and wider than that of this belly button bodied Fashion Fever Barbie.

Mattel That's So Raven doll (l) and Fashion Fever Barbie doll (r)
Mattel That's So Raven doll (l) and Fashion Fever Barbie doll (r)


Back view of Mattel That's So Raven doll (l) and Fashion Fever Barbie doll (r)
Back view of Mattel That's So Raven doll (l) and Fashion Fever Barbie doll (r)

Side view of Mattel Fashion Fever Barbie doll (l) That's So Raven doll (r)
Side view of Mattel Fashion Fever Barbie doll (l) That's So Raven doll (r)


Let's see Raven with other Mattel teen dolls closer to her height: Raven is heavier than Generation Girl Mari and hobbit-bodied Rebelde Lupita.

Mattel That's So Raven doll flanked by other Mattel dolls: Generation Girl Mari (l) and Rebelde Lupita (r)
Mattel That's So Raven doll flanked by other Mattel dolls: Generation Girl Mari (l) and Rebelde Lupita (r)



Back view of Mattel That's So Raven doll flanked by other Mattel dolls: Generation Girl Mari (l) and Rebelde Lupita (r)
Back view of Mattel That's So Raven doll between Generation Girl Mari (l) and Rebelde Lupita (r)


Side view of Mattel That's So Raven doll flanked by other Mattel dolls: Generation Girl Mari (l) and Rebelde Lupita (r)
Side view of Mattel That's So Raven doll and other Mattel dolls: Generation Girl Mari (l) and Rebelde Lupita (r)

The Play Along Galleria Garibaldi's doll body has more contrast to the basic Play Along doll body. Her painted-on underwear is different: Chanel on the left wears a white bikini bottom while Galleria wears embossed pink briefs.

Front view of Play Along Cheetah Girls Chanel (l) and Galleria (r)
Front view of Play Along Cheetah Girls Chanel (l) and Galleria (r)


Back view of Play Along Cheetah Girls Chanel (l) and Galleria (r)
Back view of Play Along Cheetah Girls Chanel (l) and Galleria (r)


Side view of Play Along Cheetah Girls Chanel (l) and Galleria (r)
Play Along Cheetah Girls Chanel (l) and Galleria (r) in profile


What about the two Ravens, side-by-side? Do you think one better resembles the actress, or do both fail in that department?

Mattel Raven (l) and Play Along Cheetah Girl Galleria (r)
Profiles of Mattel Raven (l) and Play Along Cheetah Girl Galleria (r)


Front view Play Along Cheetah Girl Galleria (l) and Mattel Raven (r)
Front view Play Along Cheetah Girl Galleria (l) and Mattel Raven (r)


Back view Play Along Cheetah Girl Galleria (l) and Mattel Raven (r)
Back view Play Along Cheetah Girl Galleria (l) and Mattel Raven (r)


Side view Play Along Cheetah Girl Galleria (l) and Mattel Raven (r)
Side view Play Along Cheetah Girl Galleria (l) and Mattel Raven (r)


Me? I think that the Play Along doll has a slight edge in resemblance. I appreciate her heavier frame, but I like the bendable arms and the complexion of the Mattel doll better. However, my Carnival Barbie will be getting that body. The Mattel Raven head mounted on a new body will become another character. Though lovely on her own, the Mbili-faced doll does not resemble the actress at all. That is my opinion.

I'd love to read your reaction. Please share them in the comments ;-)




Sunday, May 10, 2015

Quinceañeras and My Sixteenth Year Decision

Could Kelly have hidden Mitchie's other high heel?


Kelly, Mitchie, and Barbie hope you all had a happy Fifth of May!

Yet another Mexican-themed doll post? No, I have NOT recently discovered Mexican ancestors. I have learned about a doll-
quinceañera connection. It is so opposite to my coming of age experience that I had to share it here. What better way to share than in a post-Cinco de Mayo post? 

Many non-Latinos are aware that the Latin American celebration, the fiesta de quince años, marks a girl's fifteenth birthday. The birthday girl or quinceañera can wear make-up, and she receives a pair of high heeled shoes to mark her transition from childhood to young womanhood. New-to-me, though, is that the quinceañera receives a "last doll" from her father during the celebration. At the end of the ceremony, the quinceañera gives that doll to younger girls. Charming?

Aside: okay, you "know" me: I would have tried to switch my new doll for an unwanted doll. Pause to cover face. Would that have been cheating? I suppose it would. And I have loathed high heels since my teen years when wearing them gave me the grace of
Big Bird. Replace dolls with high heels? No way. I did not sacrifice my dolls and action figures.

Did I get teased at fifteen for "playing with dolls?" Yes. Did peer pressure stop me? No. Why not? Because I was an outcast already. One of my younger brothers was "not retarded" per the doctors, but he was ... different. Today, he'd probably have been categorized as autistic, but back in the 1970's, shrug. He was handsome and charming and loved. Every now and then, however, he would throw temper tantrums. He'd wail and bite his hands and pound his chest - and hit anyone in his path. So we did not do a lot of socializing. So I could keep my dolls.


In my sixteenth year, though, I became a "collector." That redefinition allowed me to continue doing what I wanted to do: retain playscale figures and miniatures in my life. My family would tease me about "playing dolls." I had to demonstrate "maturity." Play? No more ... I was a curator. Mock serious face. I had a Duty to the Future, to future students of twentieth century culture. There were not many Barbie collectors back then. Antique and/or artist dolls reigned as respectable dolls; Barbie and similar vinyl dolls were considered "tacky." I was the Vanguard of the Vinyl Playscale Doll Movement - and every bit as pompous as that sounds, lol.

Eye roll. Shrug. Sigh. That's my coming-of-age, doll enthusiast origin story. 

Happy Mother's Day


Happy Mother's Day


Friday, May 8, 2015

Cinco De Mayo: A Brief List of Mexican Dolls and Action Figures

Mattel Rebelde Mia, YBU Group Mixis Rosa, and Disney Camp Rock Mitchie Torres
Three Mexican Señoritas

Mattel Rebelde Mía Colucci, YNU Group Mixis Rosa Dominguez Katz, and Disney Camp Rock Mitchie Torres hope you had a happy Cinco De Mayo.

I did not notice any doll-related Cinquo de Mayo posts from Tuesday so I thought I would share this list ... please share if you know any I have missed. Thanks in advance!


Mattel's Mexican dolls

2014 Dolls of the World Collection - Mexico
2012 Dolls of the World — North America - Mexico
2008 Rebelde Miguel Arango
2008 Rebelde Diego Bustamante
2008 Rebelde Mía Colucci
2008 Rebelde Lupita Fernandez
2008 Rebelde Giovanni Méndez
2008 Rebelde Roberta Pardo

2006 Dolls of the World — Festivals of the World - Cinco De Mayo Barbie
2004 Dolls of the World — The Princess Collection - Princess of Ancient Mexico Barbie
 
2003 Toys R Us Friends of the World Kelly Mexico
2000 Quinceañera 15th birthday Barbie
1998 Generation Girl Ana Suarez
1996 Dolls of the World — North America Mexican Barbie 2nd Edition

1994 Toys R Us Quinceañera 15th birthday Teresa 
1989 Dolls of the World — North America Mexican Barbie 1st Edition


Mexican Dolls and Action Figures by Other Manufacturers

2005 Toy Biz Susan Storm aka the Invisible Woman (Jessica Alba)
2008 Disney Camp Rock Mitchie Torres (Demi Lovato)
1996 Arm Enterprise Selena (Quintanilla)



Saturday, May 2, 2015

May 2015 Topics: the Annual Stuff and Something New


Wow. Lot of stuff happening in May. But more than these annual favorites is one event that trumps them all (except Mother's Day; nothing trumps that):


I'm moving.

Pause to cover my ears and scream. Cover my ears to protect them. Scream because I'm excited and frustrated. I'll have to schedule posts around packing and selling. I will do better to sell some things and that means figuring out the best way to do so. Sigh. So much to do.

What I probably will not be doing is a lot of shopping. Sigh. But I saw these Chelsea friend cuties at Walmart so I'm sharing them now.








Anyone have packing tips to share? I thank you in advance for sharing them. Links welcome, too ;-)



Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Four Observations About My Action Figure Collection

D7ana: Let's talk action figures!

Reader: You mean dolls?

D7ana: No, I mean action figures.

Reader: (Sighs) Same thing.

D7ana: Not really ... I can tell you four areas where my action figure collection differs from my doll collection.

Reader: (Shrugs)

1. Quantity
I have over 480 fashion dolls. That's a rough count because I have many "hybrid" dolls: Mattel heads on Spin Master Liv bodies, Mattel-Mattel swaps, Integrity playline heads on Integrity collector doll bodies, so on. I now have a count for my action figures: 95 intact. By "intact," I mean original heads with original bodies. That's a big difference. I have fewer action figures than I thought. And I call myself a collector of dolls AND action figures. Ha!

I have dolls from at least 50 different companies; I only have 17 companies represented for my action figures. I will list them here:

21st Century
Aoshima/Skynet
BBi (Blue Box Toys)
Character Options Ltd.
Dragon AND Dragon in Dream Corporation
Formative International Co., Ltd.
Hasbro
Hot Toys Limited
Jakks Pacific
M & C Toy Centre
Majestic Studios
Palisades
Playmates Toys Inc.
Revell GmbH& Co. KG
Sideshow Collectibles
Takara
ToyBiz

2. Gender [Im]balance
Want to guess how many of those 95 action figures are female? A whopping 18. Here's a screen shot of my Excel spreadsheet showing those 18 figures:



You've probably seen all of them. My female action figures. Well maybe not Princess Leia and the Bbi Perfect Body Hispanic. I don't think that they've made many online appearances. Here's a group photo showing some of them:

Dragon Linh, Bbi Perfect Body, Hasbro Leia, Character Options Martha, Aoshima/Skynet Girl's/Lady's Mission
From left to right: Dragon Linh, Bbi Perfect Body African American, Hasbro Princess Leia, Character Options Martha Jones, Aoshima/Skynet Lady's Mission Kelly Jackson, Aoshima/Skynet Girl's Mission Mai, and Bbi Perfect Body Hispanic


Before you shake your head in dismay, hear this: while I have not yet taken count of my dolls by gender, I can tell you I have way more female dolls than I do male dolls. Doll companies create far more female dolls than male dolls. My action figure buying began with "Old Joe" as a way to increase male figures in my Doll World. So the gender imbalance does not disturb me.

3. Race Breakdown

Curious about the race breakdown for my action figures? I was so I created a spreadsheet to see what I have. That the majority of my male action figures are White does not surprise me. I do not have statistics to support this claim, but I suspect that the majority of playscale action figures are White males. Raise my hands. I'm not fighting or arguing; just commenting. Finding ethnic figures is more fun because they are a little harder to find.

I was surprised to find that I had more Asian female action figures than White or Black. Hmmm ....

Race Male Female Both
Asian 15 8 23
Black 19 3 22
Hispanic 3 1 4
Native American 1 0 1
Unspecified 0 1 1
White 39 5 44
77 18 95



4. Articulation

Usually, action figures have better articulation or pose-ability than fashion dolls. Action figures have more joints. From that list of 18 female action figures, only three have limited articulation: Hasbro's Princess Leia and Toy Biz's Storm and Xena. Those three figures could almost be considered NO-action figures. What about my male action figures? Are any of them limited posing-wise? Yes. Four: Hasbro's Basic Training Lamont A. Morris and The Defender; Jakks Pacific's Van Helsing and Chris Jericho. Usually, though, articulation puts the action in action figures.

In the photo below, I have a Mattel Harley Davidson Ken followed by a Dragon Ben Yahzee. The HD Ken is on a male poser body. The contrast is almost painful to view.







Reader: So you're telling me dolls and action figures are not the same?

D7ana: I suppose I am. Yes. They are not.

Reader: Well, I still think they're the same.

D7ana: (Sighs) Last I checked, we live in a free country. Think as you will.

Friday, April 24, 2015

Shero Dolls by Mattel

Do you recognize any of these names?

Ava DuVernay

Emmy Rossum

Eva Chen

Kristin Chenoweth

Sydney “Mayhem” Keiser

Trisha Yearwood

Mattel recognizes them. These "female heroes" or "sheroes" provide inspiration to young girls (and older women, others) by their stereotype shattering deeds.  Moreover, Mattel presented these "sheroes" with one-of-a-kind Barbie-scale dolls in their likenesses at the Variety Power of Women Luncheon in New York City earlier today. Cool, huh? 

Sigh.

Gee, I hope Mattel creates these dolls for the mass market. But since the sheroes auctioned off their dolls to benefit their favorite charity, that is not likely.

But ... then again, Halle Berry had had a one-of-a-kind doll created of her by Mattel. And Mattel later produced a James Bond Halle Berry doll. 

I owe this scoop to my blogging buddy, Arlett of Chasing Joy fame. Arlett is a "shero" in her own right. (Check her non-doll blog to read while I write that.)

Aside: I don't care for the word "shero," but I suppose "heroine" is dated? What do you think?